Episode 65

The 4 Words That Created An Olympic Champion - Lindsey Capp

In this episode, host Philippe Bartu introduces Lindsey Capp, a determined mother whose son Ronnie was diagnosed with severe autism at the tender age of 2. Experts painted a bleak picture, saying he would never make friends, drive a car, or live independently. She made a courageous decision - to discard anyone's preconceived notions of who her son was or what he was capable of. She was determined to let Ronnie discover his own potential and define his identity on his terms.

In a radical move, Lindsey gave up her job to embark on a journey of discovery alongside her son.  Together, they shattered expectations, with Ronnie ultimately becoming an olympic gold medalist in under 12 gymnastics. This remarkable story exemplifies the profound impact of love, acceptance, and embracing what is, while inspiring us to unleash incredible possibilities within ourselves, others, and the world. Prepare to be deeply moved and discover the power of embracing the seemingly impossible in this enriching and inspirational episode.

About the Guest: 

Lindsey Capp is one of the UK's top Emotional Intelligence trainers. She has a highly successful coaching and training business where she leads teams in the corporate world and also works 1-1 with entrepreneurs, helping them all to create a richer emotional and financial life. She is also the mother of three beautiful children.

´╗┐About the Host:

Philippe Bartu is a recovering people-pleasing hotelier that became a stressed-out restaurant owner and survivor of severe burnout in 2008. This led him to become a seeker of deeper meaning and purpose in life. In doing so he had a profound spiritual realisation. He saw that every human being is always ok and perfect. 

Over the last 8 years, he has led transformational international retreats and coaching programs that have helped hundreds of clients replace stress and anxiety with fun, ease, and play. He is passionate about relationships and is on a mission to create a world with less drama and more fully expressed, authentic human beings.

By reading The Ultimate Coach, Philippe deeply saw how we create our future from a place of being limited or being unlimited. Today, he helps his clients transform their relationships with their own limitations and become powerful unlimited creators.

www.philippebartu.com 


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Transcript
TUCP Intro/Outro:

Welcome to The Ultimate Coach podcast conversations from being inspired by the book The Ultimate Coach, written by Amy Hardison, and Alan Thompson. Join us each week with the intention of expanding your state of being, and your experience will be remarkable. Remember, this is a podcast about be. It is a podcast about you. To explore more deeply, visit the ultimate Coach book.com. Now, enjoy today's conversation from the

Philippe Bartu:

Welcome back. My name is Philippe Bartu. And today's episode is called the four words that created an Olympic champion. It's really an extraordinary story. And my guest here who's going to share it with us is the wonderful Lindsey Capp, Lindsey, so good to be here with you.

Lindsey Capp:

Thank you, I'm excited to share all of this with everybody.

Philippe Bartu:

Lindsay and I, we started talking a little just before we hit record. And she shared such an amazing story. I just had to stop her and said, say that save it. I want to hear this fresh, and I want to be with it. So you're in for a treat, I promise you listen to sound. This is an extraordinary story of possibility from adversity. It is a story of Rodney. And I'll let you introduce who Ronnie is. And take it from there.

Lindsey Capp:

Okay, thank you. So Rob, I have three children. I have my eldest, Ellie, who's now 22. And then I have my middle child, Ronnie. So I had experience of being a mother with my eldest, Ellie. And then you have your second child, and anybody who has a second child knows that you compare everything to your first. And so when Ronnie was born, he did everything differently. He didn't do the speaking the Gugu that Garga was he reacted very differently. He ate very differently. He didn't play like it experienced before. And so I noticed that all my expectations of what Ronnie should or shouldn't be doing was being challenged. He used to hum. He didn't say words, he used to bang his head off the floor, extreme behaviors, he would klore it his face and throw his head back. There would be such a frustration and a fear in me of not knowing why my little baby was not happy and why things weren't going to plan. And over the period of the first year, the health care and the professionals Well, it's just the way, you know, babies are, they're different. And then in the second year, I couldn't take him swimming at play groups and the mums groups, he would just sit facing a wall with a one train and it had to be that train. And he would just move it side to side for a whole hour. And if I tried to intervene, he would scream and claw at his face and the noise and everyone would be staring and looking. And there would be that feeling inside of me of helplessness. So much of that time was so challenging. And when I asked for the help from the social, well, it wasn't social workers, it was social care. And the professionals and the midwives it was wait until he's at school. And when he's at school, if there's a problem, then you get the help. Which to me was insanity. Why would we wait for him to have severe issues in his learning years? Why can't we intervene now and help and support? So I took video footage because it was so severe. I needed people to see what I was seeing and hear what I was hearing. And in taking the video footage over and over. I then went and actually protested at the social center. So i The midwives were there was also the psychologist, child psychologists. And they refuse to see me. So I actually made a stand and protested and said, I wasn't going to move until somebody watched this video footage. The police will cause it was horrific. I was treated like some kind of, you know, crazy woman, you do become crazy. When you love so intensely and feel helpless, you will do anything to be heard. And so from there, the lady was coming out, I was so fortunate. It's like the universe had my back. The lady came out of the office, and she just said get off of her. And this lady had been in the industry for 50 years and was retiring that day. It was her last session. She said, she lifted up me up and said, Come into my office. And through her heart through her being, she watched my video footage, I was in real estate. And I said, please just watch it, please see what I see. And she watched it. And instantaneously, she gave me the diagnosis that my son was severely on the autistic spectrum. And I had no idea around autism. And I said, What does that mean? What's the implications of that? And she said, he probably won't go to mainstream school, he won't make friends like other children, he won't speak to you and say, I love you. And I feel this. And he probably won't drive a car, he'll need assistance for the rest of his life. In the, in the fact that I had pushed for it. In that moment, my heart sank where I came out of that office. Although I wanted the help, that diagnosis felt like that my child had died in the possibility of what was possible for him that cause tremendous strain on my relationship with with his father. And there was a on his side, like, he'll be fine, you know, just to cast off, it'll be fine. It'll be fine. I was working for Child Protection and social services at the time. And I knew that I had absolutely no hope of learning how to be his mom. Because I had no idea how to love into this dictation. This, this need. I didn't know how. So I gave up my job. I learned the autistic spectrum and the whole variants of it. And I learned also something called pecs, which is picture education dictation system, which is how to communicate through pictures. And so I created a whole book, I took 1000s of photographs of Ronnie's environment and world. And I laminated those down into very small little squares on a Velcro book. And we learned to communicate together with pictures. And from there, it would only be grant slack. But it was a communication. And then I found a school, a primary school where I asked them to come and observe Ronnie. And could I sit in and teach the teaching staff how to communicate using this picture book. It was the book of Ronnie really have the book of view. I had the book of Ronnie, and this amazing headmaster, who my youngest daughter is now in the school. So she's 11. He said yes. And that was the revelation were through the consistency when he started speaking at five. Now I also found him a club at gymnastics where he was free because the constraints and the dictation of how he had to be in the baby groups and the clubs he couldn't hold. So I found gymnastics where he was free to express himself and do what he wanted to do how he wanted to do it. Roll it on. Ronnie learned to use his isms. That's what I call his special unique ways of being to actually create a magnificent world for himself without his his insight just with my ability to love Him in every given moment. When he would lash out. I would just wrap my arms around him and just hold him and just say it's okay. It's okay. I'm here. So Okay. And in that consistency of everything that showed up for him being okay, he learned how to really be in the world. Roll it on. And

Lindsey Capp:

Ronnie went into a gymnastics competition and he went to elite level. He consistently would do repetitions, repetitions, he would have skin on his hands hanging off, and he would continually go, because his isms were the gift of consistency without the voices of anything else coming in. Ronnie then went on to be in the competition at the London Open arena, the same arena that Max Whitlock and international Olympic Olympians were competing in London. And first of all, it was the under 12 boys. Now this is the men's artistic gymnastics. This isn't special needs. This is an improvised in any way. This is the top of the top under 12 boys in men's Artistics. So you have seven pieces of equipment. You have the ring, exactly how you see it on the Olympics, the rings, the pole vault, everything. So there he is doing his thing. There's 75 boys from all over the UK, England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. You have the morning section. And Ronnie was doing incredibly well. And he was in the running for the top five. He was actually at the top in the morning. Then in the afternoon, you have the second set, because there's 75. And they split them up. We're watching to see as the scores coming. It's like a pecking order. And somebody turned to me and said, he's done it. He's done it. He's won. Every time I say this, it never gets old. My heart just fails. And I feel that emotion again of Wow. Just wow.

Lindsey Capp:

In that moment, my son stood on the podium and the number one spot lights on him and they all clap and it's it's magnificent. My man, my little man stood on that podium at 12 where he was 11 with a gold medal and silvers and bronzes all put around his neck. And in that moment, they said he would never go to mainstream school, my son passed his 11 Plus and he said at the top grammar school, my son stood on the podium for who He was. Because I didn't listen to somebody else dictate who he could be, or who he couldn't. And in that moment, my heart filled of Ronnie is Ronnie. He has autism. He is an autistic. It's not it. Yeah, we Yes. Yeah. And that was the turning point of me really stepping into believing that a person can really be impossibility when we love from a non expectation or a entitlement. That if we're in the purity of just loving what is in the moment and believing that everybody can create that it's always possible. That I believe was the reason why my son stood as an Olympic gold medalist on that podium.

Philippe Bartu:

Absolutely incredible story. Thank you so much for sharing that. It's two things come to me there's the part of loving what is but also the part of being completely unwilling to accept anything other than a support that you need it for your son.

Unknown:

You know what, Philippe, there was a moment where I was very angry, and I was very angry. And I remember this the words exactly it was and I hope it's okay to swear. But don't tell me what my fucking son is. Before he knows. Don't you? Don't you

Philippe Bartu:

don't ruin his life? Let's you know like, Don't Don't, don't fucking ruin it for him like let him give him like this is a gift like you just saw the gift in the isness with a gift. In like you say this consistency that is off the charts. Something that gosh I mean, I don't know any, any adult, let alone a 12 year old kid who's, you know, doing gymnastics and his, you know, like, at that level and just just totally totally, totally committed in the way that you were totally, totally committed as a mother. To him. And to being. Yeah, rather than makes everything okay and loves what is.

Unknown:

Yeah. Because anything outside of that would have been suffering for us both. Yeah. That that I was not willing at any point to believe anybody over my son on who he can be.

Philippe Bartu:

Yeah. And it was ultimately a stand. First and foremost for yourself. Yeah. For yourself. And then for your son. Yeah. Yeah, that's, that's so that's so powerful.

Unknown:

You're spot on is that my whole life had been, what I wasn't and what I didn't have. And when you come with such love for your child, sometimes it takes that to really direct what's truly in your heart for yourself. But it came through the channel of this little innocent boy it two and a half years old, this blond curly blue eyed, lovely little lad so lost. I could see me in him. Yeah. And then that dictation all unconscious? But don't tell me this is who he is. How can you know? How can you know because He's unique. He's not a book. He's not a structure is not not a creation of view, or what somebody else has been. His fresh is new, his pure? How can you know? And I wasn't willing. I think that's the key is, for the first time in my life. I wasn't willing for another human being to dictate in that moment, what was possible, because I was so stuck in probably my own pain. If if I'm really honest of me wanting to break so free myself, but I,

Philippe Bartu:

You know, I'm gonna be like, there's real as well. Like, there were some big costs that you paid in taking that stand. Yeah, you didn't you didn't say it this way. But I'm gonna guess that one of the costs was your relationship?

Unknown:

Yeah. Yeah, it was, it was because there was a determination in me of her not willingness and a drive. And it was, you're either on board. or you're not. And that's okay. I mean, the kid's father, we're best of friends. And we have the most amazing co parenting relationship. And it's fantastic. And what I would say is, I trust and the reflection is, everything happened the way it needed to happen. Right? Ronnie was born to me, for who I am, in my being. Yeah. And he was gifted to me, to help me to do the work and the love and learn so much. Yeah. Wow. Amazing, amazing

Philippe Bartu:

On this story, which has really shaped who you are today, and everything that you're creating, and we're going to get some more of that. But something in the context of Steve Hardison happened. That opened up a framework. So what was behind Rodney success? What's the story behind that? So

Unknown:

Live events. So I get a message to say that this is going to be a live event. The book of being is out and my reading the book and then there's an event coming and it's all the best of the best in the creating world of beings going to be there. And I was like, Wow, this sounds incredible.

Philippe Bartu:

I'm talking about the event in London. Yeah,

Unknown:

In. In London, I think everyone's in London. So and then I there's a post and the post says Enneagram eights I'm calling Enneagram. eights, and I have a gift. And I'd like all Enneagram eights. This is a post by Steve on on Facebook. To get in contact at the time, I was with my partner and he messaged me. And he said, Steve Hardison put this post on and you're an eighth getting contact. And I was like, yeah, like, like message. And I was like, no. Stop was with someone like me like that. No, I can't do that. And he said, do it. So I just impulsively just said, Hey, I'm an eight, there might we get a message to say he selected eight eighths. And the instruction was, I want you to all get together. This is Enneagram mates, I want you to all get together. And I want you to decide who gets the ring. And I am gifting my Enneagram ring that I had personally made that I've had, I think around 20 years don't quote me on the figure 1520 yet, and I'm going to gift one of you with it. But you as eights have to decide who it's going to go to. Now, this is insane, because the personality trait of an eight is strong, assertive, independent resource for determined action orientated. Every single aid in this group is like, well, it does it belongs to me,

Philippe Bartu:

Is Steve Hardison, himself and he was one yes,

Unknown:

Yes. Yeah. So he knows what he's doing. It's like Bullseye ring. I'm saying right, but it out. Yeah, we all get together. And it's so funny for Luke because we're all there from the way of being in love. And we've been so disingenuous, because our hearts are like, I want the ring. But I also want to be the person that says, you have the ring. We're in this real paradox of, I want to be the bigger person, but I want the ring. So we're causing this and we're loving one another and sharing stories. Anyway, roll it on. And we really come to a conclusion. And it was beautiful, Steve's clever, because you got eights that really spent some time together a eights. And we really evolved into the bigger way of being, which is, it will happen the way it needs to happen. And that our way of being as primary, and this, and this is our lesson, this is our gift, the ring isn't the gift, the process is the gift. The ring is the sprinkles and the cherry if you like, but let's really stay in the process of being let's not lose sight of it in our egoic. You know, low level eight, how can we really show up in our high level eight, which is really about the the jet, you know, we're willing to jeopardize ourselves for the for the greater good. So let's trust in the process. I mean, that was that was massive. That was everything. Rolling on. We're at the event. Nobody's running

Philippe Bartu:

On a sec. So you ended the call? Yeah, yeah. And the outcome was, let's try it will happen the way it happens. It wasn't there was no trying to come to an agreement on that call. There was basically this isn't gonna listen, it's gonna happen the way it's gonna happen. So that's how you left the call.

Unknown:

Yeah, we had a couple of calls. And the first call was, you know, like, boys in a, in a ring. We all were in our egoic eight. And then, through conversation, we really came to our high level Enneagram eight, which is the surrender of the egoic mind to come into the presence of what this truly is about.

Lindsey Capp:

When I hear that trust in the process.

Philippe Bartu:

Okay, so the process then took you to the live event. Yeah.

Lindsey Capp:

Yeah. So we go to the live event. Very exciting as, as you know, and, you know, Steve comes in and there's, you know, I never forget the way he walks in. It's like, stop Jack. Did you remember that moment? Yeah. Oh, and it was electric. And we come to lunch. Nobody knows what's going on. And then we're at the Thai restaurant, and the phone pings. And it says Steve Hardison is in the waiting room. Be there in five minutes in the reception lobby. And we're like, ah, oh, my goodness, quick. The bill leaves the new doors. Let's go. And we rush back to the lobby. And there, Steve. And there's a What's the other man's name? Who gave the talk Qur'an?

Lindsey Capp:

Oh,

Philippe Bartu:

well, yeah, yeah. Karang is correct. Yeah, that's correct. Yeah. So, um, is probably the only man I've heard that is as consistent as your son running

Lindsey Capp:

Seven marathons. Lovely. So he was sitting in there as well. And he's very suave, you know, he's sitting there, and there's energy. And as I enter the room, the other eights are sitting rounds. And so we're in a circle on the settees and I walk in, and Steve says, Wow, you're a picture. And straightaway, I'm like, I get a little rabbit in headlights, trying to act call, like it's an everyday thing. But I've never been in this environment before. And I remember just taking a breath, and having an internal word that says, Be Me, just be me. And so I sat down, Steve shared the story of the ring. I'd love to share it. So the story of this ring was made, because Steve had a unexpected attack, if you like where he was in chronic pain, and he actually thought he was dying. He was rushed to the hospital. And he says, and I might not have it spot on. But this is the outline. He said. I remember laying there in such agony, that I thought this is it.

Lindsey Capp:

And I have regret that I've not lived my best life as he laid there, and the doctors came, and he really was in that. The doctors then found out that it was actually gall stones, that he had a number of gall stones that were stuck. He was rushed to surgery, and they removed the gall stones. Steve came in this story from a perspective of this ring was then made. He was an Enneagram. Eight. And he had the Enneagram ring made. And he had it made because he wanted to be a stand for living a life with no regret that he lived his best life in every minute, not knowing when the end would come. In the center of that Enneagram ring is a stone. And he asked us in that moment, have a look at the ring. What do you think the stone is? It is a unique stone, and he took it to a jeweler and he said to the jeweler, if you can guess what this stone is? I don't know whether he said I'll give you the ring or I'll give you an amount of money. But even the jeweler couldn't identify the stone. The stone where his gall stones.

Philippe Bartu:

Wow.

Lindsey Capp:

Yeah, he had them crushed and made. And he had the Enya Graham SIG sign made and designed. It's actually here Philip and your you people can't see it. But there it is. It's got the Enneagram symbol around it. And then his gallstones sealed inside, to remind him to play as a game to really show up, and he had four words engraved inside the ring. Now he didn't tell us what the four words were. And he then leaned in, and he leant forward and has such presence. He leaned in a said, I'm going to ask each and every one of you now to say one word of what this ring will mean for you. Go. So he went to CRAN and Karim said his word. And then from nowhere, and I don't know to this day where it came from because I just had this real presence of can I go next because I didn't again, the same story. I didn't want the outside world to affect my truth of the matter was for me, I didn't listen and be affected, which is the same principle as as my son but I said can I go When he said, Yeah, and I said my word. And then he went round, and people said their words. And before he got to the end person, he reached across and he said, Lindsay, this belongs to you. And in that moment, I can honestly say it was the same feeling, actually shake now. It's in my body, which was, I did this. I did this. Yeah. I through who I am being. I just was being me. Yeah, so pure and so true, it was the same of joy. Pure Joy, in that moment, just felt so long, though seems so heard, so, so valued by life itself on what it was giving me back of that feeling of being seen. So purely so lovingly, without trying without a Gen just being is incredible. And so my word was legacy.

Lindsey Capp:

To me, Ronnie, all the work that we do, everything that we're involved in, is to create a legacy that goes on and lives on that helps to create for the next generation and the next generation impossibility. That if I die in this moment, that there is a legacy through who I am being that allows impact on the next person.

Philippe Bartu:

Wow. And you know, what I'm hearing is, it's not the word legacy. But you were being that legacy in sharing that word. Right. There could have been other people, even yourself included that had said legacy. But it is the place from which you came from. I really hear that. And now moved by that. What a beautiful and powerful reminder. For all of us.

Unknown:

It was in that moment of coming from pure Self. Oh, it wasn't about me getting the ring. Right. It was about me being a stand for what I truly believe I am. Who I be in the creation of possibility again, but this time rather than me being a stand for my son, I was in that moment a stand for me. Yeah.

Philippe Bartu:

Yeah, it was the same stand Wasn't gonna accept anything less than help for your son? Yeah, it was it was that the access you had to that powerful way of being? Well, the access to her, so who you really are

Lindsey Capp:

Without stories, so

Philippe Bartu:

At what point did you? Or did those four words reveal themselves?

Lindsey Capp:

So, so exciting because all the eights are there? The words, and there was part of me, I hadn't shared the words at all until this moment, that these words are what I believe are the creation of the legacy that we all are part of. So the words are, the first word on the ring is presence. And Steve said, these four words were my commitment to living the life that I love and playing my A game as an eight presents being truly present in the moment of now. The next word is truth, creating a truth that comes from the next word, which is innocence. When we see the innocence and create a truth, and be so present, for the last word is awareness. In this new awareness in this present moment with this truth from seeing the innocence, anything is possible.

Philippe Bartu:

I'm just letting that sink in. Now it feels like that's something that has been within you all along. Yet, seeing it made a profound impact. Well, I guess what I'm curious about is as you know, it's almost like something that's what always been there. But when you see it in that simplicity in that framework and those four words, kind of lands differently than

Lindsey Capp:

That is so pure. It's so pure. Yeah. It has that profoundness of, we were truly born this way. And if we live from this place more often than not, then we're gonna lead one hell of a life. Yeah. And that this, this commitment to these four words, really for me, encapsulate everything is, how did you know how did I survive having an alcoholic self harming mother and abusive, emotionally and physically, father? How did I go through being kidnapped and homeless? And how did I go through all of those profound experiences to come to this even now speaking and share? How does it all happen? Those four words for me, we trust in becoming truly present without a past or a future entitlement. Or it can create an

Philippe Bartu:

Unwillingness to be told who we are, what's possible, how we're limited? Yeah, you know, Lindsey, there's something I want to share. That's just come to me from from your sharing. And it's about 10 years ago, I suffered a downhill biking accident. That was very severe. And I was with my brother, and we would race a lot. And the risk of I took a curve and fell over and my foot just popped out. And it was so long story, but it took a helicopter and a man to carry me out of the ditch, I fell into an I was helicoptered to hospital. By the time I got to hospital, my leg, my foot had swollen so much that they tried to take my shoe off. But they were afraid that if they took my shoe off, the whole foot would be in their hands. That's how much little skin was left hanging on. And so because it had swollen so much, they said that they had to put some anti anti swelling stuff, and that they had to wait 12 hours before they could even do anything because there was so much swelling. And they said typically, in these things, you know, there's a big chance that we're going to have to just cut your foot off and amputate because the swelling doesn't usually come down to the point where we can operate. And there was like a healthy disregard I had for that truth. There was a point where it was just like, that's, that's a possibility. That's an opinion. That's, that's, that's just one thing. And in that moment, something magical happened, I just decided that I'm just going to be present with what here's, I'm not going to entertain the stories of me losing my foot. But it didn't work very well, because I also had human rights though. I also fell into this oh, you know, what would it be like? And so conversations came up around artificial foots, and I was trying pictures and I was like, No, I don't even want to see any of that. 12 hours later, through a series of of just miracles, the while the swelling was went down enough for them to say we're going to do an operation, but just know, there's an 80% chance that you will not be able to walk. And by that I mean, no dancing, no, no driving, like all those things, right. But with an artificial foot, you know, you're with the technology. There. There's so much more mobility you'll have today. And when I came out of the operation, they still you know, I had all these like things in my third I had like a metal rod on both sides, things sticking out. I didn't know I did. I looked at my third I was just I just didn't even recognize anything. It was just so weird. You know, and and I was like, okay, it was the kind of like, drilled together. And they said, Well, good news, you know that you know that there were there were enough Xur nerves for it to be intact. And I was actually able to, to move just like one of my toes and that was enough to say that the nervous system works. So from that, he said, Well, it's taking about two years to recover before you can actually put the full weight on your foot and that'll require a lot of physiotherapy and you may be able to walk one day. Now. My mum held my foot my mum's an osteopath. She understands the body differently than Traditional doctors and she just felt all the liaisons and she said, No, you'll be fine. You'll be able to walk.

Philippe Bartu:

And it's weird because there's something I heard, you know, I heard the truth in that. And that's something I could be present. I didn't know when. And I saw the innocence in the doctors doing their job, preventing, you know, wanting to really like, just say it as it is. And then the awareness piece came when I got to see that I can choose, I actually get to choose how I want to deal with this. I decided that I was going to walk in two months. And I didn't do I didn't wait for physiotherapy, I just got out on and started moving as much as I could. I had crutches and I would just go up and down the stairs. And every day, I was able to just to do a little more and more. I don't know where it came from. It just came from a decision that I'm going to walk in two months, I was jogging. Goodness, I was free. Wow. And you know, I've never said that story like that in this way. But it just felt like story that you shared. Something everyone has that story within them. So true. We can we can recognize that and others. And when we don't accept a diagnosis, we're free to create a possibility beyond what we're told. Way beyond? Yeah. Way being wavy on. Yeah, it was. Yeah, yeah. And since then, my legacy has been to have a healthy disregard for what's possible.

Lindsey Capp:

Oh, I love it. I love it. And that is true. Freedom. True. Yeah. Incredible.

Philippe Bartu:

Yeah.

Unknown:

And that actually creates just that, that way of being. I know, we talk about being but it's so profound when it is so heart centered. The power of it is electric and miracles. I mean, it's right. Two years to two months from now.

Philippe Bartu:

Yeah, it's not it's it's it's like you said, yeah, it's extraordinary. It's beyond explanation. Yes, that is, it is.

Lindsey Capp:

And if I showed you the videos of my son, there's no way you would see who he is now.

Philippe Bartu:

Oh, you know, what I would love is if you could share that. And I'm sure there are listeners that would love to see that. Maybe we could post that in the show notes. And I would I am sure. There would be other people as well that would love to see Ronnie in action.

Lindsey Capp:

Yeah, definitely. I can show. There's a lovely video of him doing his his pommel, and he's falling off and falling off. And then you see him doing the show. I mean, it's incredible. But again, the willingness you said, word, Felipe, I wasn't willing. Yeah, I think that really is the beginning of the process of the miracles that we can create is Are you willing? Yeah. I choose to become very present in your choice right now. And that's the truth in which you create from and it has to have an innocence attached to it without a dictation of expectation. And from that awareness, everything becomes just just a gift. Just a gift.

Philippe Bartu:

That starts with the awareness of choice, doesn't it? Yeah, that's actually the first I would. I would put awareness as number one. I'd play around with that.

Lindsey Capp:

Well, it's the ring. Yeah.

Philippe Bartu:

Yeah, actually, it's nonlinear because, you know, anything can be, you know, like, like the eight you know, it's, there's no, there's no real odor to it. But that Yeah. I like pizza. Because it reminds me of the, the wonderful bread. Yeah.

Lindsey Capp:

But isn't it just, you know, stories like your story, your story of just how you overcome the outside dictation of the limitation of what somebody else has experienced even in professionalism. Yeah, we must always stay present to our own Um, willingness to create, yeah, we never lose touch of that, or we put somebody above us or we step into like a guru. You know, they know better. Yeah. No one knows you like you.

Philippe Bartu:

That's right. That's right. I actually heard someone say this the other day when you put someone on a pedestal or when you look up, or they know better, you're actually looking down on yourself.

Lindsey Capp:

That's just beautiful. Yeah, absolutely. And there's no, there's no freedom, because it's not coming from an eye. It's coming. So, to me, I mean, I have this ring on, you know, behind me, I have the middle of Rene, in front of me, right here, I have Steve's ring. And it's not there for me to use it. As Steve gave me his written. It's, that is the ring of how to create being powerfully that we all come from, right. That is all of us. That ring is all of us. We all in that. So

Philippe Bartu:

I know you're you're in the East Midlands, and I want to give you an opportunity to share about something exciting that's coming up at the end of the month. I know that along with two other wonderful guests we've had on the show, JP Morgan and Darren, who, coming together the three of you for a very special event, would you like to share a little bit about that?

Lindsey Capp:

I'd love to so on 30th of June, this this month, we are doing a two day love and money event, which is really, it's spectacular. It's really helping people to create powerfully in how they hold stories of themselves, how they create the book of themselves, you know, just how we're networking, you know, with the Bing movement on being trainers of how to create a powerful way of being a book of your own or a story of self that creates so powerfully from, you know, presence and creating a new truth. We're very fortunate to have Stuart Pearce, who is the voice coach to the king here in the UK. And he is a magnificent man. So collectively, this is an in person event that really is about exactly what we've been talking about. How to create the freedom to speak an eye that is so pure, that is full of innocence. That just feels joyful, joyful, to be out in the world. So anybody who is really resonating with the champion in themselves, you know, the gold medalist in them, we all have a gold medalist sitting within us, and locating that and creating the way of being and driving from that. That's what we're here to create on this event, two day event, this at the end of this month. So if anybody's interested to go across to creating and get their ticket, because it's going to be phenomenal.

Philippe Bartu:

I have no doubt. Lindsay, you are a champion of champions.

Lindsey Capp:

Thank you, thank you so much. For those

Philippe Bartu:

that really resonate with what you've shared and want to connect with you. And get in conversation with you. What would be the best way for them to, to reach out to find out more about what you're up to and your work?

Lindsey Capp:

Yeah, so there's two ways you can get through to me, you can come directly to Lindsey cap.com, which is through through my website. And also through creating, we do some amazing work at creating and on the creating website, you know, you can get in touch with me there and the rest of the team. So multiple ways Facebook just reaching out on Messenger, nothing too technical, but if you want to be in powerful conversation on how to elevate your way of being for yourself or others and in the world. I would welcome conversation with anyone. What a

Philippe Bartu:

Beautiful invitation. Lindsay, thank you for your time. Thank you for your sharings what an inspiration you are and and ask you for those videos of Ronnie, I look forward to watching those and for all of those of you going to London. What an amazing tree you're in for. Thank you so much. It's been a real delight to have you with us. Thanks for me